Evoked Potentials

EVOKED POTENTIAL TESTING

VEP-Visual Evoked Potential

The visual evoked potential records the amount of time it takes for an impulse to go through the optic pathway to the brain. The test is performed by a well-trained neurodiagnostic professional who will apply electrodes on several measured areas of the scalp attaching the electrodes with a conductive paste. Both eyes will be tested individually.

Duration: Approximately 45-60 minutes

BAER-Brainstem Auditory Evoked Response/Potential

The brainstem auditory evoked potential test records the time it takes for your brainstem to respond to repeated stimuli (clicking noise). The test is performed by a well-trained neurodiagnostic professional who will apply electrodes on several measured areas of the scalp with a conduction paste. Each ear will be tested separately.

SSEP-Somatosensory Evoked Potential

The somatosensory evoked potential records the nerve impulses to the brain. Your scalp, shoulder blade, and/or knees and back are measured and prepped with a skin-prep solution. A member of the neurodiagnostic staff will apply electrodes on these areas. When testing, a bar electrode is placed on the nerve that is stimulated. The patient will feel a small electrical shock. The electrical stimulation will cause twitching and a tingling sensation. The point of the test is to record the amount of time it takes for this impulse to travel to the brain.

Preparation for Evoked Potential Testing:
Hair should be washed on the morning of the test and left clean and dry. Hair needs to be unbraided; and hair accessories are only permitted prior to the actual start of the test.
DO NOT USE HAIR SPRAYS, OILS, SETTING GELS, OR CHEMICALS ON YOUR HAIR THE DAY OF THE TEST.

  • Arrive at least 30 minutes prior to appointment time to allow for check-in.
  • Please bring your insurance card and any co-payments or deductibles.
  • Take all medications as requested by your referring physician. Please be aware that certain medications (such as benzodiazepines, sedatives/tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, sleeping aids, or medicines used to treat seizures) may affect the test. However, you should not adjust your medications in any way unless instructed to do so by your physician.

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